Deer Tick

Stop Ticks On People
A Coalition in Partnership with
Families First New York, Inc.

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Lone Star Tick

(Amblyomma americanum)
 
The Lone Star Tick is primarily found from Texas, North to Missouri and Eastward across the Southeastern United States, as well as up the East coast to New Jersey and New York. Larvae, nymphs and adults will feed on a variety of warm-blooded hosts, including people. The larva is very tiny, only a little larger than the period at the end of this sentence. The nymph, the most common stage found on people, is about pinhead-sized. Adults are about 1/8-inch long and brown. The adult female has a white spot in the middle of her back. Because they are so similar in size, the lone star tick is sometimes misidentified by laypersons as the blacklegged / deer tick.
 

Lone Star Tick

The lone star tick is most active from April through the end of July. Although it can transmit Rocky Mountain spotted fever, the lone star tick is not as likely to transmit the disease as the American dog tick. This tick also may transmit tularemia and ehrlichiosis to humans. The lone star tick is not believed to transmit the bacteria that causes Lyme disease (Borrelia burgdorferi), but may be associated with a related bacteria species that has not been completely identified.
 

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